Project: Puma

Plajer & Franz under the direction of Puma head of global store concepts Ales Kernjak, the building has been completely ‘Pumarised’ inside and out with an intelligent yet simple design that embodies the joyful and witty spirit of the sport-lifestyle brand.

The impressive facade is made out of meshed metal, allowing daylight to enter the store, while at night the interior lighting beams out onto the street, providing a glimpse inside the building during closing hours.

The interior is designed to unite Puma’s various collections while celebrating footwear as the core of the brand. The lower two levels of the building are designated shopping areas, while the open roof top provides a space for performances and sport events.

A large cone-shaped staircase winds up through the centre of the store which, together with its vast red brand wall, draws customers into the space. From the base of the stairs, a footwear catwalk stretches across the entire ground floor, which is also home to the sport-lifestyle product line and black label.

‘Although the design of both areas is simple and functional, with references to Japanese architecture, both speak different visual languages and are clearly distinct from each other,’ explains a spokesperson for Plajer & Franz. ‘With a very light and flexible design, the use of materials such as black steel, plywood panels combined with re-used gym flooring elements and the mixture of matte and high gloss surfaces, the black label area carries a visible sports heritage.’

The design of the first floor, which is dedicated to the brand’s performance line, is even more flexible and functional, using more technical materials such as stainless steel and perforated metal in silver grey. A catwalk area also runs across the entire floor, leading towards a footwear focus wall.

Digital screens are scattered around the store, above footwear display tables to show brand videos, while the Puma ‘peepshow’ in the fitting rooms – a red box that opens up to show various video clips – allows customers to further engage with the brand.

‘Shopping at the new premium store is above all an experience and, in line with Puma’s philosophy, an active interaction with the brand,’ says the spokesperson for Plajer & Franz. ‘Whether creating their own customised sneakers at the Puma Factory, engaging with Puma’s sustainable actions summarised in the Sustainability Journey or enjoying the online experience via iPads, clients shall be surprised, entertained and given opportunities to identify with the brand.’

“Why interactive works in retail”

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